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Fitzpatrick, Gottheimer, Stefanik, Kelly, Boyle, Murphy Introduce Fairness to Kids with Cancer Act

Sep 25, 2019
Press Release
Bipartisan Legislation Seeks to Enhance Funding for Pediatric Cancer Research

Washington, D.C.— Representatives Brian Fitzpatrick (PA-01), Josh Gottheimer (NJ-05), Elise Stefanik (NY-21), Mike Kelly (PA-16), Brendan Boyle (PA-02), and Stephanie Murphy (FL-07) recently introduced the Fairness to Kids with Cancer Act. This legislation seeks to adjust federal funding levels for pediatric cancer at a fairer percentage rate than is currently allocated.

Specifically, the Fairness to Kids with Cancer Act would ensure federal funds for pediatric cancer research match the same percentage of the number of American citizens under the age of eighteen years as part of the general population.

“There are few things more heart wrenching than childhood cancer,” said Fitzpatrick. “No child should have to suffer through the pain of cancer, nor should any parent have to watch their child struggle to survive.  I am proud to introduce this legislation with Representatives Gottheimer, Stefanik, Kelly, Boyle, and Murphy as we present a united and bipartisan front to combat pediatric cancer.”

“Cancer is an awful disease that’s devastating so many American children and families, and unnecessarily cutting short precious lives. With this bill, we're ensuring that the federal government is investing in pediatric cancer research, in hopes that many more children are able to live longer, healthier, cancer-free lives. We must keep taking every possible step toward finding cures," said Gottheimer. "That's why I'm incredibly proud to cosponsor my friend and colleague Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick's bipartisan Fairness to Kids with Cancer Act, so that federal investment is equally distributed to pediatric cancer research. Let's work together, across the aisle, to fight back against cancer and make sure this vital research gets the investment it needs."   

“Nearly 16,000 children are diagnosed with cancer each year,” said Stefanik. “Children are the most vulnerable among us, and it’s simply unacceptable that the government spends a miniscule amount of funding on pediatric cancer research. This legislation will ensure pediatric cancer researchers have the funding they need to save the lives of kids afflicted with cancer. Every day that passes without the necessary funding for pediatric cancers is another day lost, and I urge Speaker Pelosi to swiftly bring this bill to the Floor.”

“We can and will win the war against pediatric cancer for our kids! To do that, we need to invest more in the discovery of treatments and cures that work for our young warriors,” said Kelly. The Fairness to Kids with Cancer Act is a giant step toward that goal because it focuses more money on childhood cancer research. There is more hope than ever before for the 16,000 children who are diagnosed with cancer each year. We can, and should, do more, which is why I am a proud champion of this bill.”

“I am proud to support the Fairness to Kids with Cancer Act so that every child has a better chance to make their dreams a reality,” said Boyle. “Currently, too many bright lives are lost too early and too many parents helplessly watch their child battle cancer. That’s why the federal government needs to be committed to researching these diseases so that cures and preventions are discovered and so that parents get the answers they need for their children.”   

 “There is no cause greater than the fight for our children’s right to grow up to be adults,” said Mina Carroll, Co-Founder of the Storm the Heavens Fund. “This is not about red or blue, this is about right or wrong. There is no reason this bill should not have unanimous support from everybody in Congress.”

According to the American Childhood Cancer Organization, approximately 1 in 285 children in the United States will be diagnosed with cancer before they turn 20. Cancer remains the leading cause of death among children in the United States.

 

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